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Homeschooling

What are your questions about homeschooling?

It has been almost two years since I have posted this blog, Breaking the Silence: Stop the Stigma in Homeschooling with the primary goal of letting the public be aware of homeschooling, and with the hope of having it accepted as a valid and viable option of educating children.

I have always been vocal and candid that our homeschooling journey is not an easy one due to the constant questioning, judgments, criticisms from other people (From random people to relatives). I want to share with you an example of tirades that we get (this one was online and from a complete stranger).

Disclaimer: Names and pictures of commenters were purposely concealed.

Here, highlighted in yellow were my answers. As much as I can, I try to respond with grace, patience and understanding. But I have also learned along the way, that not everyone will be as receptive and open to concepts that differ from what they have been accustomed.

Who would have known that in 2 years, homeschooling will be considered to be a part of the ‘new normal’? I have been receiving questions regarding homeschooling in the past month as parents are seriously contemplating homeschooling their kids for this school year due to COVID 19. And I encourage you to send me a message, if you have particular concerns and questions. Hopefully, I will be able to address them in my upcoming blogs where I will share more information about the basics of homeschooling.

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BookVerse

Education is not a means to an end. It’s not something you do for twelve years so you can get into a university, and then something you do for four more years so you can get a job sitting at a desk forty hours per week. Learning is a lifelong process. It happens all the time. It starts before we are born and continues until the day we die.

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BookVerse

What is essential is to realize that children learn independently, not in bunches; that they learn out of interest and curiosity, not to please or appease the adults in power; and that they ought to be in control of their own learning, deciding for themselves what they want to learn and how they learn it.